African Swine Fever Virus

Specifically designed to Identify various strains of ASFV in a single NGS reaction

Overview

NGS for African Swine Fever Virus

Despite the fact that high morbidity and mortality of African swine fever (ASF) has a severe impact on the global swine industry, there are no current effective treatments or vaccines commercially available.

In order to effectively identify and diagnose the African Swine Fever virus, Celemics introduces ASFV panel which can identify 26 strains of genotype II virus in a single NGS run.

With Celemics’ ASFV panel, we can rapidly distinguish the cause and route of infection, helping in early prevention of wide spread of the disease.

African Swine Fever Virus
Features & Benefits

Comprehensive Analysis of ASFV Subtypes

Celemics’ ASFV Panel can detect genotype II virus subtypes with our exclusive in-house designed hybridization probes. It can provide highly accurate results even from swine blood sample, which is considered more challenging due to its lower viral load compared to concentrated culture supernatant or spleen tissue sample. We have optimized the panel and reagents for your convenient and effective testing.

The panel validation result shows high uniformity and high coverage at all levels

Comprehensive Analysis of ASFV Subtypes

Mean depth coverage uniformity

Coverage

Swine-specific Blocking Reagent

As NGS experts, we understand the importance of blocking oligo and how it can affect the sequencing results. In order to provide the most effective sequencing results, Celemics has incorporated our proprietary technology to design and provide swine-specific blocking reagent that efficiently filters out repetitive sequences, allowing for the selective retrieval of ASFV sequences

With the same sequencing amount, target enrichment NGS yielded 29% virus reads out of a total of 1,039,018 reads, while whole genome sequencing (WGS) yielded 0.5% virus reads (green) out of a total of 39,261 reads.

Swine-specific Blocking Reagent
Workflow
  • Celemics’ African Swine Fever Virus Panel uses DNA samples obtained from swine peripheral blood which contains a low amount of viral DNA compared to other tissue samples such as the spleen. Because blood samples are easier to obtain compared to other sample types, this panel provides convenience in the experimental preparation stage. Also, target capture probes specialized for ASFV DNA provide sufficient virus sequence information, leading to a cost-effective experimental experience by preventing additional NGS operation.

DNA Library
Preparation

Hybridization

Sequencing

Analysis
with BI tools

Capture

african swine fever virus - workflow
Workflow
  • Celemics’ African Swine Fever Virus Panel uses DNA samples obtained from swine peripheral blood which contains a low amount of viral DNA compared to other tissue samples such as the spleen. Because blood samples are easier to obtain compared to other sample types, this panel provides convenience in the experimental preparation stage. Also, target capture probes specialized for ASFV DNA provide sufficient virus sequence information, leading to a cost-effective experimental experience by preventing additional NGS operation.

DNA Library

Preparation

Hybridization

Capture

Sequencing

Analysis
with BI tools

african swine fever virus - workflow
Workflow
  • Celemics’ African Swine Fever Virus Panel uses DNA samples obtained from swine peripheral blood which contains a low amount of viral DNA compared to other tissue samples such as the spleen. Because blood samples are easier to obtain compared to other sample types, this panel provides convenience in the experimental preparation stage. Also, target capture probes specialized for ASFV DNA provide sufficient virus sequence information, leading to a cost-effective experimental experience by preventing additional NGS operation.

DNA Library

Preparation

Hybridization

Capture

Sequencing

Analysis
with BI tools

african swine fever virus - workflow
Workflow
  • Celemics’ African Swine Fever Virus Panel uses DNA samples obtained from swine peripheral blood which contains a low amount of viral DNA compared to other tissue samples such as the spleen. Because blood samples are easier to obtain compared to other sample types, this panel provides convenience in the experimental preparation stage. Also, target capture probes specialized for ASFV DNA provide sufficient virus sequence information, leading to a cost-effective experimental experience by preventing additional NGS operation.

DNA Library

Preparation

Hybridization

Capture

Sequencing

Analysis
with BI tools

african swine fever virus - workflow

Specification

*Gene Add-On Service: Genes can be added by customer’s request.
Target viruses* ASFV 26 strains
Target size 192 kb
Mutation type Virus detection, Virus genome assembly
Sample type (amount) Swine blood (> 50 ng of fragmented DNA)
Platform All sequencers from Illumina, Thermo Fisher, MGI, PacBio, and Oxford Nanopore
Bioinformatics Support Celemics Virus Verifier (Detection report)

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Resources

Technical Resources

[Product Sheet] Celemics Agrigenomics Panels

[Product Overview] Celemics Innovative NGS Solutions for Agrigenomics

[Product Overview] African Swine Fever Virus Panel

[Best Practice] African Swine Fever Virus Panel

Celemics Target Enrichment Panel Overview

Celemics Products & Services

Safety Data Sheets

MSDS_African Swine Fever Virus Panel_Illumina

MSDS_African Swine Fever Virus Panel_Thermo Fisher

MSDS_African Swine Fever Virus Panel_MGI

References

Transboundary and Emerging Diseases

Genomic Epidemiology of African Swine Fever Virus Identified in Domestic Pig Farms in South Korea during 2019–2021

Kwon O-K, Kim D-W, Heo J-H, Kim J-Y, Nah J-J, Choi J-D, et al. Genomic epidemiology of African swine fever virus identified in domestic pig farms in South Korea during 2019–2021. Transbound Emerg Dis. 2024;2024:1–11.

 

10.1155/2024/9077791


View Detail >

Scientific Reports

Genomic epidemiology and evolutionary analysis during XBB.1.16-predominant periods of SARS-CoV-2 omicron variant in Bangkok, Thailand: December 2022–August 2023

Puenpa J, Chansaenroj J, Suwannakarn K, Poovorawan Y. Genomic epidemiology and evolutionary analysis during XBB.1.16-predominant periods of SARS-CoV-2 omicron variant in Bangkok, Thailand: December 2022–August 2023. Sci Rep. 2024;14(1).

 

10.1038/s41598-023-50856-0


View Detail >

Microbiology Resource Announcements

Genome characterization of a Korean isolate of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus

Kim D-M, Moon S-H, Kim S-C, Lee TG, Cho H-S, Tark D. Genome characterization of a Korean isolate of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus. Microbiol Resour Announc. 2024;13(1).

 

10.1128/mra.00118-23


View Detail >

Microbiology Spectrum

Canine respiratory coronavirus in Thailand undergoes mutation and evidences a potential putative parent for genetic recombination

Poonsin P, Wiwatvisawakorn V, Chansaenroj J, Poovorawan Y, Piewbang C, Techangamsuwan S. Canine respiratory coronavirus in Thailand undergoes mutation and evidences a potential putative parent for genetic recombination. Microbiol Spectr. 2023;11(5).

 

10.1128/spectrum.02268-23


View Detail >